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Hanna-Mae Illustration

Illustrator & eco clothing designer

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perspective

Final leg of the learning curve

This month I’ve been talking a lot about perspective with this month’s review being the book ‘Perspective & Composition’ by Barrington Barber (you can read it here). I’ve been continuing my learning curve with practising using the 1-point and 2-point perspective method and looking up examples of good perspective artwork.

I found this youtube video to be particularly good in clearly explaining the method (click to open new window): ‘How to Draw in Perspective for Beginners‘. Youtube can be a great resource for art enthusiasts, particularly those who are teaching themselves.

I’ve been a member of the website DeviantArt for a while now (my first account was set up in 2006!) and I’ve always found it an inspiring place as you get to see other’s art work and browse whatever topic takes your fancy. This past week I’ve been taking a look at ‘perspective’ and here are some pieces that really caught my eye, some because they clearly show the use of perspective lines. Click the names to be taken to the profile.

TitaniumDream

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‘Perspective Practise’ by TitaniumDream

I like how this piece is a mix of imagination and theory. You can clearly see this is an exercise in perspective and can see the 2-point perspective lines.

EpHyGeNiA

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‘Anatomic Perspective’ by EpHyGeNiA

In the book I reviewed last week there were various examples of where perspective can be used. The human body was briefly covered and this is an example by EpHyGeNiA.

 

LisaCrowBurke

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‘2-pt Vertical Perspective’ by LisaCrowBurke

I love this piece as it’s so interesting. I think it’s a great example of an interesting perspective but I think it’s made so much more than that by the inclusion of the pigeons.

 

 

Next week I’ll be bringing you a special St David’s day tutorial and I’m excited to say that soon I’ll be visiting the Leonardo da Vinci exhibition: ‘Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing‘ to mark the 500th anniversary of the famous artist’s death.

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Monthly Review: Perspective & Composition

Last week I talked a bit about the online art course I’ve started and how one unit had been focusing on perspective (link). The unit prompted me to dig a bit deeper into the subject and today I’ll be reviewing the book ‘Perspective & Composition’.

Image result for Barrington Barber perspective

 

Full title: Essential Guide to Drawing; Perspective & Composition

Author: Barrington Barber

Price: £4.99 – £23

Where to buy: WaterstonesBook Depository, Amazon, ebay

About: An instructional guide to the ‘rules’ of perspective and composition, with step-by-step exercises.

I first came across Barrington Barber’s instructional drawing books when I was a teenager and used to lap up the art books in The Works. Although this particular book claims to be ‘practical and inspirational’ I’d argue that the former is at least true! As someone who loves step-by-step instructions both written and with visuals, I do like Barber’s books. However, this more methodical, instructional tone doesn’t exactly get you fired up with creative ideas. The covers of Barber’s books tend to be quite tame with a ‘school’ vibe about them and the interior looks almost text-booky. However, the contents is quality.

The layout is logical, with a clear font, sub-titles and diagrams so is good for all kinds of learners, be they visual or more text-based. There are also mini projects throughout to ensure you understand the concepts being explained so there’s a good balance of theory and practical.

I think this book would be best suited to art students, particularly around GCSE and would be useful in a classroom or tuition setting. Although, it would also be useful for those teaching themselves. One section mentions ‘Compositions by Master Artists’, which could potentially encourage further research and study.

Another thing I like about this book is that although it’s short it tries to keep the users interest by covering different ways of using perspective, for example when drawing people or objects in addition to just landscapes and scenes.

Although this book wouldn’t encourage me to purposely seek out any more of Barber’s books I did take something away from it and it’s worth a read if you’re really struggling with the concept of perspective. For me, the best way to learn about perspective is to practice, practice, practice and learn to trust your eyes; draw what you see, not what you think you should see.

Gaining some perspective

As any artist will know it can be difficult to focus when your mind is all over the place. Lately, my mind has been flitting from one thing to another meaning any sustained period of work has seemed near impossible! However, I’ve had a couple of short sessions over the past week where I felt really engrossed in my work and felt I channelled a lot of emotion.

I feel like art isn’t just a subject for some people, it’s so much more. To me, it’s not just something I’m ‘good at’, it’s an outlet, a distraction, part of my identity. Art is such a huge part of who I am I feel like it’s actually part of me, which is actually really quite reassuring when you’re battling with identity and trying to establish your place in this busy world.

I’ve started my distance learning with the London Art College and so far I’m finding it interesting. Initially I was wary of the way Unit 1 had me going right back to very basics but I feel like I still took something away from it. Unit 2 was interesting as it covered perspective, which is something I haven’t particularly found myself delving in to much over the 15 years I’ve been studying art. It was generally assumed that perspective was just a matter of getting the proportions and distance of what you were looking at right. Unit 2 took a more…’geometry-based’ approach (if that’s the right term to describe it) which actually had me searching the library to find out more. Next week I’ll be reviewing the book ‘Perspective & Composition’ by Barrington Barber. Perspective isn’t something you generally always have to worry about in the world of Illustration and I’ve found many inspiring pieces that appeal to the eye that aren’t in perfect perspective. It got me thinking of my own work though and how I’ve dealt with perspective without using the system described in Unit 2. Generally, I rely greatly on my own perception and trust what my eyes are seeing. I remember being just 8 years old and a teacher saying to me: we often draw what we think we should see, not what we actually see. I’ve remembered this ever since and always make a point of saying this to myself when I’m drawing from life. Below is an example of how I’ve used perspective relying on this concept.

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‘Union Street’ by Hanna-Mae Williams

At the moment I’m working on a still life piece that focuses on using shading to create depth. The advice given was to focus on the display as a whole. This is a real challenge for someone like me who often gets bogged down in the details! But I’ll be posting the finished piece soon. It feels good to be working in pencil again and taking time out from life to be creative.

 

 

 

 

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