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Hanna-Mae Illustration

Illustrator & eco clothing designer

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oilpaint

There is rapture on the lonely shore…

‘There is a pleasure in the pathless woods,
There is a rapture on the lonely shore,
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep Sea, and music in its roar:
I love not Man the less, but Nature more’

From ‘Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage,

by Lord Byron,

published between 1812-1818

As I mentioned in my last post, I’ve recently brought my focus back to the seascape I began late last year. Having recently signed up to DeviantArt (you can find me here: hmwillustration) I was excited to delve in to their user-contributed galleries, to sift through hundreds of inspiring seascapes by artists from across the globe. Here are my top inspiring pieces. Be sure to check out the links for more of these talented artist’s work and for full-size versions.

seablog1

http://hitforsa.deviantart.com/

Artist/photographer Paul has many captivating seascapes in his online gallery, and this is one of my favourite. I love the rich colours in this piece, and how the ‘traditional’ expectation of blues and greens that are associated with the sea have been completely ignored.

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http://bluefooted.deviantart.com/

As soon as I saw this piece it made me feel nostalgic as it reminded me of something I’d see in a storybook as a child. In fact, artist Erin used her favourite book ‘Winter’s Tale’ by Mark Helprin as her inspiration. I love the almost muted tones and the patterns in the sea.

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http://annmariebone.deviantart.com/

Looking at AnnMarie’s gallery I was surprised to learn she works mainly with acrylic as her pieces have a ‘softness’ I often associate with oils. The colours in this piece was what drew me to this, and it’s not just limited to this piece either. In AnnMarie’s gallery you’ll find tons of stirring pieces, I highly recommend checking out her ‘Golden Wave’ painting, which uses colour in a way that may surprise some.

Creativity inspires creativity

‘House by the Railroad’, ‘Girl with a Pearl Earring’,’The Goldfinch’…what do all these paintings have in common? The fact that they inspired someone enough to fuel their own inspiration, and create a whole narrative.

Over the past two weeks I’ve been considering the way in which we view art and allow our thoughts and impressions to create meaning beyond that intended by the artist. It cast my mind back to my dissertation, titled: ‘Forms of perception: To what extent does our physiology influence our interpretation of symbolic images in comparison to learnt cultural influences?’It’s interesting to see how one persons interpretation of a scenario can differ so vastly from another, which is exactly what happened last week when my writing group was presented with Georges Seurat’s ‘A Sunday on La Grande Jatte’ (1884).

A Sunday on La Grande Jatte - 1884
Seurat,1884,source link

With the majority of us having limited background knowledge on the piece (therefore being influenced  by contextual aspects only to a very small degree) the way in which each individual ‘read’ what was happening in the scene differed from person to person.

Last week I took you on a tour of my work space, including my ‘inspiration wall’, which contains many art postcards. The images that make it to my wall all have one thing in common: they take me somewhere else. They’re not just images, they’re visual stories which set my mind on a path to either imagined places, or evoke a feeling or memory. Below are some wonderful works from very talented artists whose work sets you wondering about the story behind the image. (Please click title links for full size and additional info)

dark_forest_by_raskadow

 

‘Dark Forest’

Nick Tripiciano

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under_the_table_by_themaze-da4h97o

‘Under the Table’

Dario Mekler

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tribute_to_debi_bismarck_by_inkwell_illustration-d4szxxg

 

 

 

‘Tribute to Debi Bismarck’

Dustin Panzino (Inkwell Illustration)

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And my own work open for interpretation: ‘One for Sorrow‘ Oil & pencil.

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Did you guess the books/movie linked with the artwork mentioned in the beginning?

‘House by the Railroad’ 1925 by Edward Hopper is said to have inspired the Bates house in Psycho.

‘Girl With a Pearl Earring’ 1665 by Johannes Vermeer inspired the novel of the same name by Tracy Chevalier and was later turned into a film.

‘The Goldfinch’ 1654 by Carel Fabritius inspired the book of the same name by Donna Tartt.

Monthly Review – paintbrush cleaners

paintcleaners

What put me off oil paints initially was the fight to get my brushes truly clean. I tried a few tips (and stained a few sinks!) before finally discovering what worked best for me. I used to keep a set specifically for using oils and always found there’d be trace amounts of paint left behind on them,tainting the colour I was trying to create. Some people swear by washing up liquid, but as I often work with small brushes for fine detail, I find the condition of my brushes just as important as the removal of paint. In this months review I’ve brought you three of the best conditioning cleaners, their strengths, downfalls, and where to get your hands on them!

cleaner1

Name: Water washable oil brush cleaner

Brand: Daler Rowney

Price: £5 – £6:50

Stockists: Jackson’s Art Supplies

Rating: 3.5/5

Benefits:

  • Low odour (solvent free)
  • Biodegradable
  • Conditions brushes whilst cleaning, using natural oils

Negatives:

  • Slightly tricky to pour (if pouring into smaller pot)
  • Can separate slightly
  • No longer stocked in high street stores such as Hobby Craft/The Range

How to use: As this can slightly separate be sure to shake first, then pour a moderate amount into a smaller pot. Wipe excess paint off your brush using tissue/paper towel before swirling your brush around a few times in the cleaner. Tap off excess before swirling in a jar of water and drying on paper towel.

cleaner2

Name: Turpenoid Natural

Brand: Weber

Price: £5 + depending on size (236ml shown in photo)

Stockists: Jackson’s Art Supplies , Amazon

Rating: 4.5/5

Benefits:

  • Low odour
  • Doesn’t separate
  • Conditions brushes whilst cleaning
  •  Nontoxic
  • Can double as a medium

Negatives:

  • No longer easily available in high-street stores such as The Range/Hobby Craft
  • Tricky twist cap (though good if you have inquisitive children!)

How to use: I pour a little into a separate pot, wipe the excess paint off the paintbrush wish paper towel, then swirl the brush a few times in the cleaner. You can either wipe with a paper towel and carry on, or swirl in water then dry (as I do)

cleaner3

Name: The Masters Brush Cleaner and Preserver

Brand: B&J

Price: £4+ depending on size (Available in 4 sizes, 75ml shown in photo)

Stockists: Pegasus Art , Jackson’s Art Supplies , Amazon

Rating: 4/5

Benefits:

  • Suitable for all paints, not just oils
  • Conditions brushes whilst cleaning
  • Beautifully presented
  • no odour
  • Cleans incredibly well

Negatives:

  • One of the pricier cleaners
  • Some waste, as you have to wipe away left over paint grime from the top

How to use: Wipe off excess paint from brush, swish in water then carefully rub in circular movements on the solid block of cleaner. Swish brush in a clean jar of water before drying with a paper towel.

winner

And the winner, by the tiniest whisker is… Weber Turpenoid Natural! Whilst I noticed how conditioned my brushes were, and how well The Masters Brush Cleaner and Preserver cleaned my brushes, I found Turpenoid Natural lasted longer and cleaned just as well. However, if you’re looking for a universal brush cleaner, as opposed to just oil cleaner, I would highly recommend giving The Masters a try.

Happy painting!

 

psst! Now that you’ve got the cleaning up afterwards sorted, why not head on over to these tutorials for some inspiration?

Painting clouds with oil paints

Treetorial

 

 

Treetorial

via Daily Prompt: Paint

Like art tutorials? Follow my blog for a monthly ‘how-to’. You can discover more lessons in ‘Accurate drawing for beginners‘ and ‘Painting clouds with oil paints‘.

 

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‘The Magic Forest’ Hanna-Mae Williams

 

Welcome to August’s tutorial! This month I’ll be showing you how to paint background trees using water-mixable (or regular if you prefer) oil paints.

You will need:

  • Oil paints in various shades of brown  (I used burnt sienna, raw umber, and burnt umber) white, yellow ochre, crimson, and sap green
  • Liquin original
  • paint brushes (including one flat)
  • paper or canvas suitable for oil paints
  • paint brush cleaner
  • paint palette

 

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Step 1

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Mix burnt sienna, some burnt umber, and a small amount of Liquin to get a medium brown.

Step 2

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Paint a general tree shape – straight and flaring slightly at the bottom. Don’t be afraid to apply the paint thickly, this will add to the texture we’re looking for (see picture below). This is also why it’s important not to over-do the liquin – you need only enough to slightly lubricate the paint but retain the thickness.

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Step 3

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Tidy up the edges of your tree using a smaller brush, but don’t be too worried about lumps and bumps. Real trees are never perfectly straight! Again, don’t be afraid to add quite a lot to your brush (see below) this will help with texture.

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Step 4

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Now we’ll be using the flat brush to add white (zinc white is less intense than titanium white, which is preferable right now as we want the white to blend a bit with the brown). Use a dry brush (no thinners etc from now on) and lightly dab on the left of the tree and drag across. Do this all the way down your tree.

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Step 5

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With a small, clean brush loaded with white, now’s the time to add the real highlights. Dab white (avoiding merging with the brown) over the marks you’ve already made.

Step 6

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Using your darkest brown (raw umber) and using a clean, dry brush, dab this colour near the roots, up the left, and between the gaps all the way up your tree. Don’t worry too much about colours merging.

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Step 7

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Now’s the time to use the more interesting colours. It may seem a little unusual, but if you truly observe nature you’ll notice the unexpected variety of colours! Using the same brush as in step 6, take a small amount of ochre and dab lightly up the right side of the tree, towards the centre (see below). Unlike with the browns, a more light-handed approach is needed with these more vibrant colours. The aim is to make them blend in naturally, rather than to stand out.  

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Step 8

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Dab the crimson around the root area and up the left hand side of the tree, partly covering some of the darker areas. You just want to give a hint of red.

Step 9

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As with the crimson, the green should be subtle. Think of where you would find moss growing on a tree and lightly dab these areas.

And there you have it – how to paint background trees using oils!

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Having trouble getting your brushes fully clean? No problem, read my review on the best brush cleaners out there! Monthly Review – Paintbrush cleaners

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