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Hanna-Mae Illustration

Illustrator & eco clothing designer

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Monthly tutorial: Spring decorations

This month I’m showing you how to make your own spring decorations. These clay butterflies are super easy to make and would make a lovely handmade gift for someone.

You will need:

  • Polymer clay in two or more colours (such as Fimo or Premo)*
  • Thin ribbon or embroidery thread
  • A small rolling pin (or even a pencil will do!)
  •  Something to make holes (such as a large safety pin)
  • A cookie cutter

* A more eco-friendly alternative to polymer clay is air-dry clay. I’ve noticed it now even comes in different colours, take a look at hobbycraft’s selection here: link

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Step 1

Take a chunk of each of your coloured clays and warm them between your hands until pliable. Roll your clay into a sausage shape and twist, working the clay until you get a marbled effect.

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Step 2

Roll your clay out evenly using your rolling pin and place your cookie cutter over the clay, before pressing down firmly.

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Step 3

Carefully pull away the excess clay (save this, you can use it to make unique beads!)

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Step 4

Poke a hole in the top of your shape (depending on your shape you may need two) and thread some colourful embroidery thread or ribbon through and knot the ends.

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First steps

It’s been a while since I posted, and although I’m not tip-top I feel as though I’m taking the first steps on a long, but ultimately positive one. After years of pain that has got increasingly worse, I finally have a diagnosis. I feel it’s a bitter-sweet thing, as now that I know what I’m dealing with I can tackle it head-on by researching my condition, and trying things that have helped others. I’m hopeful that physiotherapy will prove useful, and I’m keen to explore all avenues. In terms of my mental wellbeing I feel this is just as important as my physical wellbeing, and feel as though, for the first time in a long time, my mind is open to new ways of thinking and living my life. It’s early days, but I feel a change is afoot.

I’ve been keeping up with ‘Project Speedy Sketch‘ and am quite excited at the prospect of curating an online mini exhibition to share with you. I’ve also been experimenting with pens after stumbling upon some unbelievably detailed work that I never imagined could be achieved with this medium. To keep myself busy I’ve been taking my sketchbook along with me to various places keep my mind occupied and teach myself how to use this medium. I often use fineliner, and have tried brush pens in the past with no real breakthrough, but was inspired by how these talented artists (see end of post for awe-inspiring work) managed to achieve such works of art! I’ve been dabbling with Winsor & Newton promarkers and find myself currently ‘on the fence’ as to whether this is a medium I’ll pursue.

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In addition to this I’ve also been putting some finishing touches to my Spring/summer children’s clothing collection, and have donated some pieces to charity. As my health has been quite tricky this year, I’m gearing up for a ‘proper’ launch when I’m feeling stronger. I’m thrilled to bits with the tags I had made by RibbonReelPrinting on etsy, and as the story behind my clothing is such a significant part of what I do, I’ve added a tag with an explanation on to each item.

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I’ve also taken my Folksy shop off ‘holiday mode’ and re-listed some of my items. I’ve also added sections to make it easier to navigate. If you’re looking for a unique card for Father’s Day (don’t forget – June 18th!) then take a look at my cute illustrated keepsake card.

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I’ve got loads more so share with you over the coming months, so keep your eyes peeled for new book reviews, vegan recipes, and lots of inspiration. You can find a list of all previous reviews and inspiration here: List

To finish I’m leaving you with some ink work that will leave you amazed! (Click names to visit full online gallery)

Ekaterina Putyatina

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Ekaterina produces artwork that’s so realistic it could almost be a photo! Her attention to detail is what really drew me to her fantastic work.

 

Wheeler3030

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New to Deviantart.com but so far I like what I see! Each piece in Wheeler’s gallery is jam-packed with interesting detail – each time you look you notice something different.

 

 

Sydney Nielsen (SydneyNielsenArt)

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As soon as I saw Sydney’s gallery I was hooked! Her work is bursting with colour and life. This piece appealed to the side of me that loves pattern.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monthly tutorial: Inspiration board

First tutorial of the year!

via Daily Prompt: Year

 

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To kick off 2017’s series of tutorials I’m going to show you how to make an inspiration board. They’re so versatile as they can be adapted to any size and decorated in any way you can imagine! They’re perfect for displaying your stash of art postcards, ACEO’s, or any other bits and pieces of inspiration that need a home.

 

materials

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» Light-weight wood board (mdf)

» Wadding (available from craft/fabric stores)

» Cotton material (less ‘busy’/patterned is best)

» Complimentary/matching ribbon

» Complimentary brads or buttons

» Complimentary/matching thick paper/thin card

» All-purpose glue

» Fabric scissors or craft knife

» Cotton thread to match your fabric

» Standard thin sewing needle

» Double-sided sticky tape

instructions

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Begin by cutting your card/paper to roughly the same size as your pre-cut board.

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Use PVA glue mixed with a very small amount of water and spread a thin layer over your board.

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Smooth out any air bubbles by gently pressing/wiping over with a clean piece of kitchen towel.

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Put your board to one side to let the glue dry, and place your chosen material DESIGN FACING DOWN, and place your wadding (cut to size) on top as central as you can, before carefully flipping it over the right way.

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Evenly space your ribbon, trimming off excess, laying three diagonal one way, and then 3 diagonal the other way on top.

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Carefully pin to the material/wadding, and sew (through the material, wadding, and ribbon) with a few stitches.

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Stick your brads through all the layers, and fasten (if using buttons, attach at previous step) and place this wadding/fabric FACE DOWN.

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Retrieve your board. Use your all-purpose glue to roughly cover the board.

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Place your board, with your paper/card FACING UP, onto your wadding/fabric. Try to get it as central as possible. Press down a few times.

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Once your wadding/material is stuck to your board (all-purpose glue tends to set fast) it’s time to tackle the over-hanging material. Put a strip of double-sided sticky tape across the top of your board, and fold the material over.

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Trim any excess ribbon.

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Now to neaten the corners; put a strip of double-sided sticky tape just beyond the edge of the board, and fold the excess material towards the board, over the sticky tape, to form a neat right-angle.

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Repeat the past 3 steps on the opposite side of your board, until you have this:

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Now it’s just a case of folding over the remaining edges.

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Use small amounts of glue to secure any flapping edges, then move on to your ribbons.

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Let your board dry fully before using.

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There’s just one thing left to do…fill with your favourite things!

Leaving your PRINT on 2016

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Houses linoprint, Hanna-Mae Williams

I’ve been so inspired lately by all the fantastic lino/block prints popping up on pinterest! In this post I bring you some of my favourites, and if you’re left feeling inspired yourself, why not check out this tutorial from painters-online? ‘Print your own seasonal greetings cards using linocut techniques‘. It’s a versatile and easy way to get eye-catching results!

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Andrea’s designs are quirky and use colour in a way that really sets off the image. You can see tons of her wonderful creations by visiting her instagram page (click the icon below). The talented print-maker even shared her knowledge by publishing a book in May this year, which is available on Amazon: ‘Block Print: Everything you need to know for printing with lino blocks, rubber blocks, foam sheets, and stamp sets’

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harriet

 

 

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Harriet is a fellow illustrator whose work includes, but isn’t limited to print. I found this skull piece on pinterest which in turn led me to her behance profile, and more of her exciting projects. You can see all sorts of mediums in Harriet’s quirky style by visiting her website harrydrawspictures.com or connect with her via social media using the icons below.

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helen

 

 

 

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As soon as I saw this linocut on pinterest I had to add it to my collection of favourites! Helen is a multi-talented illustrator, graphic designer, and of course print-maker.The gallery on her website ‘Helentimburydesign.com.au‘ is full of colourful, inspirational eye candy.

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Happy printing!

Taking Great Photos – Quick book review

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Title: The Crafter’s Guide to Taking Great Photos: Foolproof techniques to make your handmade creations shine online

Author: Heidi Adnum

Publisher: Search Press Ltd (21st Dec 2011)

Price: £12.99

Are you a crafter looking to show off your work online? Or perhaps an artist wanting to show your work in it’s best light? Whether you’re a complete novice in the world of photography, or are an old hand just looking for tips and ideas on brushing up your skills, then this is the book for you!

Organised into logical chunks and divided by craft (for example ‘fashion & fabrics’ and ‘knitting & needle craft’) the book is easy to navigate your way around, whilst also having the benefit of visual examples to accompany written instructions, for those of us who learn better by demonstration rather than text alone.

However, to fully understand the layout I strongly recommend scanning the contents pages before you begin (something often overlooked in eagerness to ‘get stuck in’) as subjects such as ‘light’ are found not only in the ‘camera basics’ section, but also further on in the ‘DIY accessories tutorials’ section, which without understanding the layout could cause confusion.

What’s wonderful about the book is that, unlike some photography books, it’s not automatically assumed that the reader has extensive, or even further than a basic understanding of photography, and guides you step-by-step, from the very beginning (getting to grips with a camera) to the very end (editing, uploading, and generally making use of your photos).

The book also includes interviews with practitioners who work within each subject area, for example knitting, and presents relevant questions. This allows beginners to learn from other’s experiences, saving time spent ‘hitting and missing’ – this has already been done for you! and the resulting conclusions/tips there for the taking.

The book also takes into consideration cost, meaning it’s in-tune with the reality of the often limited budget of artists and crafters. What you spend on purchasing this book, you could potentially save on photography equipment. The section ‘DIY accessories tutorials’ offers relatively simple and low-effort (not to mention inexpensive) ways of creating everything from a tripod, to a light tent and light box.

My second recommendation is to arm yourself with a pen and notepad and take notes as you read, as there are so many useful hints and tips throughout. After reading the book I came away with several pages of useful advice. Below are my top 5 favourite:

fave

  1. Read your camera manual! (yes, it may sound obvious, but we’re often so eager to get started with our gadgets that we fail to consult the manual. Learn the modes/settings on your camera)
  2. Plan your shoot beforehand
  3. To show the scale of your fabric, use items involved in the making, for example, dressmaker’s scissors
  4. You can add ‘value’ to your photo by using your own packaging and props
  5. Make use of what’s around you – try shooting in a forest or somewhere industrial

 

This book is available on Amazon .

 

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