Search

Hanna-Mae Illustration

Illustrator & eco clothing designer

Tag

drawing

Tis the season…to get creative

Here in sunny Wales it’s been raining for over a week! Although soggy strolls with my dog and taking refuge in coffee shops have been welcome excursions out of the house I’ve been enjoying finishing off my Christmas card design. I’m happy with the finished product and am eagerly awaiting the arrival of my order from the printers.

finaldesign.jpg
Final card design, water mixable oils.
carddesign1
Edited design 1 (pre-made digital background)
carddesign2
Edited design 2 (pre-made digital overlay/text)

I feel it was worth taking time over the colour palette as it all ties together nicely. If you missed last months tutorial: ‘Developing your ideas’ you can read about how to tie all your ideas together: link

As my old neighbour (‘old’ as in from my previous home) has been so kind to me this year I decided I would also get a mug printed using my design and give it to her as a Christmas gift.

mugdesign

Now that I’ve got my Christmas cards sorted I’m focusing on a sewing project for my best friend’s nephew. I finally have an excuse to use up the stash of felt sheets I’ve been hanging on to for a while and am working on hand-sewing a personalised pouch (with lion pocket on the front) filled with wild animal finger puppets.  So far I’ve finished an elephant, a panda, and a tiger. As a long-term vegan I feel it’s important to know all about what I’m using; where the material/food/cosmetics etc I’m using are sourced and the process behind creating them. As some of you may know vegans generally avoid using any animal-related products, one being wool. It’s up to each individual what they choose to avoid/use but I believe in the importance of making informed decisions. You can read all about wool and the ethical issues behind it in my up-front guide here (click to view) : ‘Loom knitting for beginners and your guide to ethical knitting’

Although I’ll be using my own cards this year I have purchased a special one from a talented individual for the owners of a gorgeous little cockapoo who my own dog is in love with! The likeness is uncanny and if you’re looking for some unique dog-inspired art or cards for that dog lover in your life then MindfulDogCo is the shop for you! Run by the talented Imogen who’s based in Southampton, you can find her online shop here: link

 

xmascard
Christmas card from MindfulDogCo

Christmas is such a wonderful excuse to get creative, from card making to baking and making your own gifts. Next week I’ll be showing you how to use your leftover wrapping paper and turn it into something beautiful!

 

Happy creating!

Advertisements

Creative gifts: My favourite five

Christmas is just around the corner so today I’m going to bring you a little bit of inspiration, thanks to some very talented artists and craft enthusiasts. I always like to support small businesses and individuals and as these items aren’t mass produced the recipient of your gift will be getting something truly special and more personal. Click the name to be taken directly to the shop.

My Favourite Five

1

 

 

 

Lyndsey Green Illustration

Rabbit Illustration eco tote bag, £8

dec1.jpg

Aside from the fact that this is a fantastic illustration (and perfect for any animal lover) I also love the fact that this bag is eco friendly. Delivery is just 95p.

2

 

 

 

Artwork by Angie

Dog illustration print, £14

dec2.jpg

As a dog lover this really appeals to me. I love the cheerful colours and humorous caption too. This would be great for someone who has a dog. Postage is free.

3

 

 

 

Casey Illustration

Watercolour robin illustration print, £6

dec3.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

I just had to include this! I think this has so much character and is really unusual. You’ll also find a selection of printed gift tags in Casey’s shop. Postage to the U is free.

4

 

 

 

Lyndsey Green Illustration

Red fox cushion, £20

dec4.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is one of Lyndsey’s illustrations printed on a faux suede cushion (so perfect for art-loving vegans!). It’s also available on an eco cotton bag. Postage is a reasonable £1.50.

5

 

 

 

Inkishop

Dog mug, £10

dec5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I love everything in this shop! From the quirky tote bags, to the adorable cards and mugs, they’re all quirky and guaranteed to bring a smile to any animal lovers face! Postage £4

 

 

Monthly tutorial: Developing your ideas

This month I’ll be guiding you through how to develop your ideas. For me, this part of the creative process is just as important as the creating itself, as it’s the pre-planning that forms a solid foundation for my work. So let’s get stuck in…

‘Where do I begin?’

If you’re working towards a brief (if you’re studying art/design at GCSE onwards this word will become familiar to you and you’ll hear it often) then you have a good starting point. Read it carefully and make bullet-points or highlight exactly what it is you need to fulfil. Are you designing a Christmas card? A design for packaging? Does the brief state what style/feel they want? The more information you have the easier it is to generate ideas. Starting a self-led project from scratch can be difficult because every decision you make has to be your own and a successful design isn’t usually created by just picking up your paintbrush straight away without any blueprints. If you don’t have a brief, set yourself one. Write down briefly what you want to create, who/what it’s for and what sort of style you want. For example, I’m creating a Christmas card design, it’s for my family and friends, and I’d like it to convey warmth and cosiness and be in a cute illustration style.

‘What next?’

Now you’ve got your basics you need to build on this. Your task is to convey your meaning successfully. It can help to make some notes (I like to do colourful spider diagrams) to get any ideas in your head down. Let’s use my brief as an example. It’s for Christmas so I’d write down all the things I associate with Christmas, for example: holly, mistletoe,family get togethers, gifts, snow, stars etc. Do the same for the other important messages behind your intended design, in this case ‘warmth and cosiness’, which made me think of things like: blankets, thick coats/jumpers, fireplace, hot drinks etc. You’ll have quite a bit to work with by the end of this idea outpouring, so you need to narrow it down and decide which elements you think will work well together or excite you most.

Next steps…

Once you’ve decided what you’d like to include it’s time to pull the pieces together. How are you going to put these elements together in a way that’s natural and pleasing to the eye? It can help to do a bit of research at this point, see what other artists have done, and how they’ve gone about positioning things. If you’re designing a greeting card it can be really useful to browse card selections in shops. Bear in mind the message you want to communicate and work around this. For me, I wanted my design to be ‘soft’, which means soft, rounded shapes that curve and flow, rather than sharp edges. This is why I chose to position my chosen features (poinsettias, mistletoe etc) in a circular wreath and made my character rounded. Collecting images and making a small inspiration board to refer back to can be really helpful. When designing my Christmas card I collected a few photos of poinsettias and hedgehogs and worked from these, remembering my desire for ‘softness’.

 

 

hedgehog.jpg

drink.jpg

gingerbread.jpg

 

I like to do rough sketches of each element I plan on using before bringing them all together. I knew I wanted to include a hot drink in my design so I sketched a couple of versions of this until I found a version I was happy with. I like to make notes next to my sketches, for example, I wanted my hedgehog to be more rounded, so I wrote a note to remind myself ’rounder’. It’s ok for your rough work to be messy, no one will see this stage, this is your chance to get all your ideas down and play around to see what works.

Colour!

When you’re happy with your sketches and have decided the layout of your design it’s time to think about colour. Some colours work harmoniously and this is what will be most pleasing to the eye. Have a think about what sort of message you’re intending to send with this design, do you want it to feel cold and wintery for example? (in which case you’d consider cool colours) or warm an cosy? (in which case you’d consider warmer colours). For my design I wanted warmth but also to continue the feeling of ‘softness’. For this reason I chose not only warmer colours but quite muted versions of these colours. By this I mean I didn’t choose just orange, I chose a more burnt orange. A lot of the colours I chose I had to mix with colours such as burnt umber, burnt sienna and ochre to get that muted tone. I’m a huge fan of building yourself a collection of paint sample cards for use in your art/design planning. Get a file and get in to the habit of picking up some sample cards/booklets any time you find yourself in or passing a DIY/home shop. You can also just pay a visit to one when you have your colours already in mind. If you know you want cool colours, go and pick up sample cards just of these. You can do this for each project. I then hold colours I think I want to use next to each other and decide which appear most harmonious. When you’ve chosen, stick them to your rough sketches so you have a guide of what goes where. As you can see below, I’ve assigned colours to various parts of my character.

nov2

 

Starting your final design

Before starting your final design it’s useful to work out sizing and most of the time I like to have a complete rough version with everything in place. Once you know where everything is going and how large it needs to be, it’s time to select your paper and begin. You can read about selecting the right paper in my guide: ‘Choosing the right sketchbook‘.  I chose to use fine grain heavyweight paper as I wanted a hint of texture as well as a paper that could hold oils well. Once you’ve transferred your design, you can begin adding colour. What medium you use is up to you but it’s essential to use paper that can handle your medium (see my mentioned guide, above, to read more about this).

As you can see on my rough pages, I’ve mixed my colours and tested them next to the samples before applying them to my piece. It’s a good idea to have some scrap paper nearby to test your colours on, particularly as they can appear different on your palette than on your paper. Some colours can dry lighter, some darker.

blognov1.jpg

I’ll be revealing my own complete design next month and kicking off December with some unique, creative gift ideas for you!

Happy creating!

Three to see!

As my blog followers will know, I love to find enthusiastic artists out there and give them a bit of exposure here. There are so many talented individuals out there whose work just needs to be seen and shared! As I’ve been working on my large Mabinogion piece (if you missed the post about this you can find it here: link) I decided to have a dig on Deviantart (you can follow my account here: hmwillustration) for some Celt-inspired work and came across some superb pieces. It was difficult to narrow down my favourites but after much deliberation I’m sharing my top 3. Be sure to check out each artist’s profile, or better still let them know what you think of their wonderful work! Please remember that the copyright belongs to the artist.

 

1

Roberto Pavic  (DeviantArt name: roblfc1892)

Roberto has been a member of DeviantArt for many years and his gallery is full of interesting photography and tattoo designs. He has a whole gallery folder dedicated specifically to Celtic tattoo design, with my favourites being his Celtic dragons. Also look out for the exquisite ‘Swallow’ and ‘Ravens’.

(click image for direct link)


nov1

2

Rachel Arbuckle (DeviantArt name: CelticArt)

Rachel is from Italy and has a love of Gouache paint. Her gallery is entirely dedicated to Celtic designs and is a treasure trove of intricate work. Below is one of my favourite pieces, titled ‘Twelve Days of Christmas’.

nov2

 

3

Lucie Ondruskova (Deviantart name: LucieOn)

Lucie is from the Czech Republic and works a lot with watercolours. Her gallery has a collection dedicated to her ‘Knotworks and Patterns’ which are made truly unique with her interesting application of watercolour and small additional details. Below is ‘Celtic Butterfly’, just one of many beautiful pieces of subtle knotwork.

nov3

Next week i’ll be posting my usual ‘Monthly Tutorial’. This time I’ll be showing you how to develop your ideas.

What’s in store for November?

It’s hard to believe it’s November already! This year has flown by in a blur. Lately I’ve been doing a lot of thinking, about where my illustration is leading me, how I want to utilise my creativity and where it’ll take me in the future. Trying to meet a deadline I’ve fallen into the mindset of my current piece being more of a chore than how I want my time creating to be. When I allow myself time and space, art is my therapy. When I relax and just go with the flow and allow myself to really get in tune with my work is when I actually produce the best results and really engage with the process. In the coming years I’d like to look further in to art as therapy and hope that starting voluntary work working with people with Alzheimer’s will bring the opportunity to bring someone pleasure and a mode of creative communication.

Here are some of my recent rough sketches for the piece I’ve been working on. The piece itself will be made up of many elements and I’m currently working my way through each one, until I feel happy with the final version that I’ll then transfer to my prepared paper.

dragon1.jpg

 

 

 

 

mabinogicharacter.jpg

 

The piece I’m working on is based on The Mabinogion, a collection of medieval Welsh tales. The stories are full of adventure, peril and mythological creatures, such as dragons and the cyclops. Above is my interpretation of a ‘Coranian’. The Coraniaid appear in the tale of Lludd and Llefelys and are a race of people that are said to be like a plague; their hearing is so intense that it’s impossible for them to be harmed as they always hear when danger is coming. When I’m creating characters I like to do some visual research. For the Coraniaid I researched medieval clothing to get a sense of what sort of things they would wear, and as the Coraniaid are said to be small i imagined a stocky build. I’ll be talking more about creative processes later this month in my monthly tutorial.

Later this month I’m hoping to visit an exhibition in Peterborough hosted by the City Gallery titled ‘Fabric of Society‘. As someone who’s interested in textiles I’m looking forward to seeing this and will be reporting back in my monthly review next month (the exhibition runs until January).

Next week I’ll be reviewing, as promised, another of Brian Froud’s  unconventional works: ‘Lady Cottington’s Pressed Fairy Letters‘. If you haven’t already read last months ‘Goblins’ review, you can find it here link.

 

 

Tis the season…almost

Ok, so it’s only September but anyone who’s involved in any craft/art work will know that Christmas preparation starts way in advance. You’ve probably already seen the Christmas craft magazines creeping on to the shelves and with good reason! If you’re planning on including handmade gifts or handmade elements this year you’ll need time to actually make them! I’ve already started some rough designs for Christmas cards, which I’m doing alongside a competition entry. I was keen to see what other creatives were offering this year, so I’ve got together a list of some of my favourite card designs so far. Head on over to their online shops to see more!

Heidi Meier Textiles

It’s not just Heidi’s Christmas cards I love, she also has some gorgeous birthday/everyday cards. One of my favourites is her Blue tit card (link) Heidi’s work is that little bit ‘different’ which gives her cards a real edge. Below are two of her cards that would be perfect for Christmas, especially for a dog lover! Click the image for a direct link to the item in her Folksy shop.

outreach1.jpg
‘Toby’ by Heidi Meier

 

outreach2
‘The Last Post’ – Toby the Dog by Heidi Meier

 

Brittany Molineux

Brittany’s Etsy shop is full of gorgeous illustrations available as prints or cards and I’m really admiring her Christmas offerings. Below are two of my favourites. Click the images to be taken directly to the listing.

 

 

 

outreach3
‘Danish Houses’ by Brittany Molineux

 

outreach4
‘Partridge in a Pear Tree’ by Brittany Molineux

 

Simons Nest (Kerry Williams)

I think what I love most about Kerry’s illustrations is their quirkiness, there’s something a bit different about Kerry’s illustrations and I love that a lot of her work is nature-themed. Take a look at her Autumn/pumpkin items (perfect for Halloween!) I’m in love with the Pumpkin Spice Badge Set. The selection of mini cards below are great for celebrating the winter season.

outreach5
‘Winter Favourites’ mini greetings cards by Kerry Williams

 

Choosing the right sketchbook

You’d think it would be the easiest thing in the world: finding some paper to start your art project. But when you’re just starting out in the world of art (such as GCSE students etc) it can be perplexing to navigate your way around the vast options available. Don’t be tempted to reach for the cheapest option just to save some money! I’m sure plenty of you have been in a situation where you begin full of enthusiasm only to find that your paper is wrinkling or your ink bleeding. This is because it really is important to be using the right kind of paper for your piece, it really can make or break a piece. I’m going to take you through the basics of choosing a sketchbook when you’re just starting out, or are just getting serious about pursuing your artistic interest. I’ll be putting key points/tips in bold/colour.

All sketch books will generally be suitable for what it says in the title: sketching. Just getting some ideas down in pencil. Where problems usually arise is when you begin using other mediums, especially ‘wet’ mediums such as paints and ink. The very basic sketchbooks you can find almost anywhere (such as budget shops) are usually not suitable for anything more than just getting down some ideas in pencil.

Over the years I’ve learnt to feel my paper before choosing in addition to looking at the description/symbols on the front of the book/pad (more on this later). Generally, cheap papers are quite rough to the touch and will feel thin. Slightly higher quality paper will feel thicker, but may also have a rough texture. But BEWARE! If you do choose a cheap sketchbook for just doodling it’s good to know that cheaper kinds of paper won’t usually stand very much erasing. Ever seen higher quality paper advertised as being ‘acid free’? This is beneficial because it means your work is less likely to fade and the paper less likely to break down.

Let’s talk about cartridge paper…this type of paper is widely available and a lot of illustrators and artists are happy to use it.  If you do decide to go for basic cartridge paper for paints such as watercolour bear in mind it must first be prepared. Painting directly on to lower GSM* cartridge paper will cause buckling and you’ll end up with a wibbly painting! The process of preparing paper for watercolours/gouache is known as ‘stretching’. It’ll take a little effort to do, so if you’re desperate to get stuck in to some work straight away using wet mediums it’s best to avoid low GSM cartridge, or make sure you have a stash of pre-prepared sheets. I learnt how to stretch paper on an ‘introduction to art’ summer school at a local college when I was 15 and found the course a real stepping stone into GCSE art, which then progressed to A level, which then progressed to a degree. By the time you reach university it’ll just be assumed that you know these basics. It’s good to look out for taster courses or holiday schools at local colleges/uni’s as you could pick up some skills that prove useful for the rest of your artistic journey. You can find so many videos on Youtube showing you how to stretch paper: link

Now we’ve covered the cheaper ‘everyday’ papers let’s look into specifics. The good news is that a lot of the sketchbooks they stock in art and hobby stores usually have guides on the front, it’s just a matter of reading the symbols and understanding what certain things mean. Something I found confusing for a while was ‘hot pressed’ and ‘cold pressed’. It’s actually as simple as this: hot-pressed paper has a smoother, finer surface, whilst cold-pressed has a more textured surface. Some pads don’t even mention these terms though and keep it more straight-forward by saying ‘smooth’ or ‘grained’. It’s really a matter of personal reference, I use both depending on the finish I want.  As I usually work with a lot of detail I generally avoid heavily grained papers as lines can be less ‘crisp’. Thanks to the information on a lot of sketchbooks it’s actually now easier than ever to select your book. Some pads will say ‘mixed media’, meaning that generally any medium is ‘safe’ to use, others will say ‘watercolour’ or ‘drawing’ (Daler  Rowney label their sketchbooks really well making it easier to select one). As for symbols, they’re easy to work out; a paintbrush head means it’s suitable for paint, a fountain pen means fountain pens can be used, a fineliner/pen means drawing pens may be used and what looks like a conte stick means pastels can be used. But there’s one area that I know confuses a lot of people…GSM*. This stands for ‘grams per square metre’. Basically, the higher the GSM the heavier the paper, meaning it can handle more. GSM is sometimes written as ‘G/M2’. Papers with high GSM are usually labelled as ‘heavyweight’.

I can’t stress enough how important it is to understand what paper you’re using before you begin an important project, mainly to avoid frustration over things like buckling, bleeding, eroding etc. I think the most important thing you can do is read the specs of the paper (even individual sheets in art/craft stores will usually have a little label telling you hot/cold pressed and GSM) and if you’re not sure then ask!

Time for some recommendations! For general doodling and really rough work I carry around a small ‘Graduate‘ sketchbook. These are Daler Rowney’s reasonable, lower GSM books that come in various sizes. Hobbycraft also offer their own version of these, with a similar GSM and a very modest price tag. For work that I plan to use (for exhibitions, card designs etc) I rarely stray far from Daler Rowney finegrain heavyweight paper as I find it can hold all mediums really well. I’ve used pastels, oils, gouache, pens, pencil and I’m always happy with the results (though be careful if working on small areas in oils especially oils that have been thinned as sometimes you can get a ‘halo’). I also recommend Daler Rowney’s smooth heavyweight when I want less of a textured surface. If I’m solely using gouache or watercolour I may also opt for their Aquafine smooth pad.

So that’s it, your guide to choosing the perfect sketchbook. Happy creating!

Monthly tutorial: Using Body-Chan model for artists

Last week I reviewed Body-Kun models for artists and as promised this week I’ll be showing you how to use them. As I’ve been experimenting with children’s book illustration lately I’ll be creating a character in this style.

The instructions that come with some Body-Kun sets show one way to use the sets but I like to use them just as direct references. You can take a photo using your phone then upload it to Photoshop and go from there (there are plenty of videos on youtube showing this) but I’ll be showing you how to develop a character in a more traditional way.

Start off by getting your model in to your desired pose. Body-Kun dolls are just the right size to be used with dolls house furniture, so you can use props. You can use the stand if you’re using a flying or standing pose, but as mine was able to balance on its own I didn’t use it.

NB: Apologies in advance for the not so great lighting!

chantutorial1

Once you have a pose you’re happy with, place the doll at the right height depending on what perspective you want. I wanted mine straight-on, so placed it at eye level.

chantutorial2.jpg

This is your reference, so now you just start drawing! Don’t worry about clothing etc at this stage, just draw what you see. Below I’ll show you the steps I went through.

 

chantutorial3.jpg

 

chantutorial4

chantutorial5.jpg

 

chantutorial7.jpg

 

chantutorial8.jpg

 

chantutorial9.jpg

chantutorial10.jpg

 

Once you’ve finished drawing out the basic shape, make your lines more fluid. I think that when it comes to children’s illustration the lines are much more soft, less angular. I’ve just drawn some guidelines on the face, though with children’s illustration characters don’t have to adhere to any real measurement rules.

chantutorial11.jpg

 

Once you’ve smoothed off your silhouette, rub out the inner lines and begin drawing in your clothes. I’ve decided my character will be a gardener.

chantutorial12.jpg

 

 

 

 

chantutorial13.jpg

 

Keep adjusting as you go along until you’re happy with the shape and how the clothes sit.

chantutorial14

 

Once you’re happy with your body/clothes you can add your face and hair. Don’t forget to rub out the inner lines.

 

 

chantutorial15.jpg

Once you’re finished with the drawing stage you can begin to add colour. I decided to outline mine with fine liner first.

chantutorial16 (2).jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overcoming obstacles

After an impromptu break I’m finally back and feeling like my old creative self again. After two losses of two wonderful, strong women I found myself in a bit of a daze, neglecting the part of my personality that used to bring me so much joy and a sense of identity: creativity. A few weeks ago though I felt as though a veil of apathy had been lifted suddenly off my body, and the ideas and excitement came flooding back. I’d really missed this important part of my life and it feels so wonderful to welcome it back.

Although my degree is in illustration I’ve always been most at home with a more fine art style, sticking to this because I know it’s my strength and I know how to get the results I want, but inside my heart I’ve always held a love of children’s book illustration, and I’ve been having so much fun lately playing around with this style. Until now I’ve always wanted my work to be ‘right’ from the time I start until the time I finish, not really allowing myself much time to play around and experiment, but I’m turning over a new leaf! I’m reminding myself that it’s ok to make mistakes sometimes, and that experimenting is part of the joy of creating. On a long train journey recently I listened to an interview with Judith Kerr, the inspirational 95 year old who wrote and illustrated children’s books such as ‘The Tiger Who Came to Tea’ and ‘Mog’. It was so refreshing and reassuring to hear her admit that even after decades of illustrating she still finds certain things difficult and said ‘ I do a lot of rubbish, you have to work through the rubbish’. I’m allowing myself to be more experimental and reminding myself it’s ok to explore an idea, then decide it’s not going in quite the right direction. ( You can listen to the interview with Judith Kerr here: Link)

I’ve been spending a lot of time imagining up characters that belong in the pages of a children’s book and feel like I’ve finally found a style that works for me and that I’m happy with (excuse the dimness, i took these early morning)

character1 (1).jpg

character2 (1).jpg

character3.jpg

character4.jpg

Artists and illustrators, particularly students, often talk of ‘style’, something which I’ve been reading about lately. It’s interesting to hear different people’s views and I’ve been a bit on the fence with my own opinion. I’ve just signed up to a 5 day email course on ‘finding your style’ as I’m curious to see what this could bring up. After years of creating art work almost daily I feel like when it comes to fine art I’ve developed a way of working that works for me, that I ‘know’, and use again and again, but when it comes to illustration I feel like I’m more transient. When it comes to character design I’ve found a way that works for me, but on the other hand there are so many ways of drawing and creating that a part of me feels I shouldn’t confine myself to a certain way of working. I read an interesting blog post that left me feeling reassured, that said some illustrators just don’t stick to a specific way of working, they work more to their brief, something I feel I can accept. However, I’ve also read other opinions saying that style is important as it’s almost like your calling card, it helps identify you as an illustrator. After reading some good reviews I’m currently working my way through ‘Illustration Workshop’ by Mary Kate McDevitt, which has been helpful in giving myself some focus. It claims to help you ‘find your style, practice drawing skills, and build a stellar portfolio’. Although the book is American, it’s still relevant to the UK, and I’m enjoying working on the projects, as well as reading the useful tips that are scattered throughout. You can find it on Amazon for around £10-£13 (LINK)

I’m really enjoying engaging my brain again and have been looking into possibilities for the near future. As someone with ASD and fibromyalgia getting about can be a bit difficult, but after some research I’ve been opened up to a world of possibilities. I want to reassure anyone with physical or social difficulties reading this that there are options out there for you, you just have to find them, and find a way of working/living that works for you and your particular lifestyle. For quite some time now I’ve been interested in using art as therapy and although I looked into doing my masters in Art Psychotherapy and went to an open day I knew it would be very full-on, especially for someone with limited physical and social energy. Although disheartened I decided to look in to alternatives and found an online course. Although this won’t qualify you as an art therapist you’ll receive a diploma and learn what art therapy entails. I’m hoping to use this when I begin volunteering with the Alzheimer’s Society as a ‘side by side’ volunteer (one to one visits to individuals with Alzheimer’s) to engage who I’m paired with. The Open University is also a good option for those who have disabilities or work/family commitments. I’m currently studying ‘Improving Health & Wellbeing’, which I felt could also help with my volunteering. It may surprise some people to know that even some mainstream universities offer ‘distance learning’.  For example, the University of London offers an MA in Art History. I’m keen in the near future to apply to study for my Masters in Illustration (distance learning) at the University of Hertfordshire. I was also excited to see that the London Art College offer an ‘Illustrating Children’s Books’ year-long online course. So whilst living with a disability can often feel frustrating and feel like your possibilities are limited, there are ways around it.

Last week I visited for a second time the awe-inspiring Peterborough Cathedral. My best friend lives not too far away and first took me to this treasure a few months ago. The architecture is unbelievable and sitting in the grounds sketching on a sunny day under a tree is a lovely way to spend an hour. Last time I visited we popped in to the visitor centre and discovered a little exhibition. It was so nice to meet the artists behind the work. It was all fantastic but two women’s work really spoke to me. I loved the way Stacey-Ann Cole (LINK) used watercolour, it translated really well into postcards, and was definitely something I’d love to frame and put on my wall. I also met mosaic artist Mahemuda Arsalani whose work was so beautiful. I loved her mosaic hearts so much I got one for my Mum’s birthday (she also loved it!). You can visit her website here: LINK

mosaic.jpg
Mosaic by Mahemuda Arsalani (Muni’s Mosaics)

As for my sewing (as you know I love nothing more than upcycling material into something new!) for a while now I’ve been interested in getting involved with a charity called ‘Days For Girls’, who in their own words:  ‘increases access to menstrual care and education by developing global partnerships, cultivating social enterprises, mobilizing volunteers, and innovating sustainable solutions that shatter stigmas and limitations for women and girls’.  There are sewing groups and individuals (known as ‘super sewists’) all over the world, creating the ‘DFG Kit’, which is then sent to young women across the globe. What a great way to use up my leftover material…as well as a good excuse to pick up some more! If you’re a keen sewer with a little time to spare, or have been interested in joining a sewing group, visit their volunteering page to find out more: Link

material.jpg
Leftover & new material

So I’m happy to say that I’m back and will be starting my monthly reviews again, kicking off with Body Kun/Chan artist model dolls (gone are the days of the clunky wooden mannequin!) and in coming months I’ll be reviewing materials, books, and hopefully exhibitions.

Have a creative July!

 

 

 

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: