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Hanna-Mae Illustration

Illustrator & eco clothing designer

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Out with the old

I’ve been dying to get stuck in to some artwork lately, especially as my Sakura Pigma Micron pens arrived yesterday but my time has been taken up mostly with packing things up to move. I’ve been having a good sort out of my art and craft materials and going through old pieces. My collection of past work has been piling up over the years, so I’m considering being ruthless and finally parting with some!

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As I’ve known my current neighbour for over a decade now I wanted to make her a special card to say goodbye rather than just buy one. Since I’ve been experimenting with children’s book illustration lately I decided to go with a cute design which would be good practice in this area.

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I’m already thinking of my next project and the deadlines I have. For the past couple of years I’ve been involved in the Y Galeri Caerffili Winter Exhibition and as soon as I get myself settled I’ll be starting work on this year’s entry. I have so many ideas in my mind and at the moment am doing a bit of reading on my subject choice (which is top secret for now!). As it’s going to be quite an involved piece I think it’ll be my main project for the rest of this year. Next year the charity Viva! are holding an artwork auction and I’ve been asked, as part of ‘Art for Animals’ to contribute a piece. It feels wonderful to feel excitement again over projects after a very difficult beginning to the year.

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Monthly tutorial: Using Body-Chan model for artists

Last week I reviewed Body-Kun models for artists and as promised this week I’ll be showing you how to use them. As I’ve been experimenting with children’s book illustration lately I’ll be creating a character in this style.

The instructions that come with some Body-Kun sets show one way to use the sets but I like to use them just as direct references. You can take a photo using your phone then upload it to Photoshop and go from there (there are plenty of videos on youtube showing this) but I’ll be showing you how to develop a character in a more traditional way.

Start off by getting your model in to your desired pose. Body-Kun dolls are just the right size to be used with dolls house furniture, so you can use props. You can use the stand if you’re using a flying or standing pose, but as mine was able to balance on its own I didn’t use it.

NB: Apologies in advance for the not so great lighting!

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Once you have a pose you’re happy with, place the doll at the right height depending on what perspective you want. I wanted mine straight-on, so placed it at eye level.

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This is your reference, so now you just start drawing! Don’t worry about clothing etc at this stage, just draw what you see. Below I’ll show you the steps I went through.

 

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Once you’ve finished drawing out the basic shape, make your lines more fluid. I think that when it comes to children’s illustration the lines are much more soft, less angular. I’ve just drawn some guidelines on the face, though with children’s illustration characters don’t have to adhere to any real measurement rules.

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Once you’ve smoothed off your silhouette, rub out the inner lines and begin drawing in your clothes. I’ve decided my character will be a gardener.

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Keep adjusting as you go along until you’re happy with the shape and how the clothes sit.

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Once you’re happy with your body/clothes you can add your face and hair. Don’t forget to rub out the inner lines.

 

 

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Once you’re finished with the drawing stage you can begin to add colour. I decided to outline mine with fine liner first.

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Monthly review: Body-Kun models for artists

Name: Body-Kun models for artists

Price: Varying depending on doll/set

Brief Description: PVC posable male/female/baby jointed dolls for use as reference by artists and illustrators. Available in various colours.

I was so excited to find these dolls! I’ve recently been working on my illustration style and creating characters (see my previous post for more! link) so decided to dig out my old school wooden artists mannequin. Whilst it was fun trying out some poses, it just wasn’t cutting it. The shoulders were square, the hips too narrow, and the proportions, at least in my opinion, were just so ‘off’! I started searching online for an alternative and discovered the world of Body-Kun. At first I was thrilled when my first doll (Chibi Body-Kun) arrived and after some success using it as a reference I was keen to see the potential of the others. However, my enthusiasm was premature and I’m sorry to say that it was all down hill from there! That’s not to say there aren’t good points about these dolls (which I’ll get to soon!) but one refund and one replacement later and I think it’s fair to say my enthusiasm has waned somewhat.

 

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SH Figuarts Chibi Body-Kun

 

Because I was impressed with Chibi Body-Kun’s flexibility, I allowed myself to disregard the fact that the spare hands that came with it didn’t fit (the hole was too small to attach them) thinking it was just a one-off. Wanting to see if the other dolls would work as well as this one had, I ordered, from the same ebay store, what I thought was the same line but was actually different. The dolls I will be reviewing are mainly SH Figuarts, often listed alongside, and confused with Figma Archetype. The second doll (female) that I ordered was Figma Archetype and the difference in quality was notable. On opening the package I was disappointed with the strange anatomy of the character (pointy calves, unnaturally long neck, sticking out shoulders) and the flimsier material used on the pelvis area got jammed in the hip joints. There was also something peculiar about the arms, the way in which the joints, particularly on one arm, stuck out. I went back online and realised I’d ordered a doll from a different line, but asked for a refund as I felt the quality was a huge let down.

 

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Figma Archetype – pelvis/hip joints

 

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Figma Archetype – detached shoulder joints

 

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Figma Archetype – elbow joint

 

 

As I’d ordered from the same company and had to message them anyway, I decided to mention the hands that didn’t fit on the Chibi Body-Kun and they offered to send me a replacement. When this arrived, one arm wouldn’t attach properly at the elbow and was too loose to use, however the hands did fit, although I was given one set of two left hands. I now had two Chibi Body-Kun dolls, both with different problems. My solution? To use elements from each to create one working doll! I found the head was too big for the type of character I wanted to create too, so decided to take it off! (NB to be fair this was listed as ‘Chibi’ which in manga/anime art usually involves a small body with an out of proportion head).

 

 

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Chibi Body-Kun & replacement

After receiving a refund for the Figma Archetype ‘she’ doll I decided to order an SH Figuarts Body-Chan, the female equivalent of Body-Kun. When it arrived I was much happier with the quality, though it did cost me a bit more. It was worth paying the extra as I feel this doll is usable, whilst I will probably never use the previous one. You can get dolls on their own, or in a set with accessories. I opted to get Body-Chan with accessories, which were great fun to play around with, and gave a good base/starting point for ideas. I feel that quality control is an issue with these dolls though – the arm joint of Body-Chan was sticking out, and she definitely wasn’t as flexible as Chibi Body-Kun. However, I was impressed that even her feet were jointed. This set (unlike Chibi Body-Kun and Body-Kun) came with an instruction leaflet. The leaflet is in Japanese, but the pictures are easy to follow.

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Body-Chan leaflet

 

 

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SH Figuarts Body-Chan

 

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SH Figuarts Body-Chan jointed feet

 

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SH Figuarts Body-Chan protruding elbow joint (left)

Fairly happy with my Body-Chan purchase I next decided to try out Body-Kun. I expected this model to come with a stand, which it didn’t, but as I had a stand for Body-Chan I thought I could use this one. However, the hole at the back was too large and the doll was loose on the stand (though SH Figuarts stands do come with the option of attaching a sort of ‘claw’, which holds any Body-Kun/Chan doll. Again, I felt quality control was an issue. Within minutes I had issues. I tried to change one of the hands but a piece of plastic broke off meaning I couldn’t attach any hands. The dolls, especially because they’re so small, are very delicate, and as it requires some pressure to get the hands on/off it’s a breakage waiting to happen. My only option was to reach for the superglue. By this time I was a bit fed up with messaging about faults, so decided to just accept that my Body-Kun would have the same hands forever (leaving the replacement hands useless). One of the foot joints was also jammed and no matter how much I tried to free it, it just wouldn’t move. Again, quality control seems to be a big issue here.

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Body-Kun broken hand joint

 

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Body-Kun pose
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Body-Kun pose

In terms of using Body-Kun as a reference I really feel like it would be more suited to artists who like to draw action, rather than illustrators looking to create more friendly, ‘picture-book’ characters. It’s very muscular, though compared to Figma Archetype ‘he’, it’s less extreme.

Would I recommend these dolls to fellow illustrators and art enthusiasts? Probably not. Mainly due to quality and questionable anatomy. However, I do see how they could be useful to those who find it difficult to use their imagination when envisioning characters. They can be helpful in reminding you what a certain pose looks like, but only vaguely. I just feel they’re too inaccurate to rely on for precise reference so a bit if imagination is required (which is always exciting in my mind!). I do prefer these dolls to wooden mannequins, though wooden mannequins are much more sturdy.

Next week: Monthly tutorial: using Body-Kun to create characters

Overcoming obstacles

After an impromptu break I’m finally back and feeling like my old creative self again. After two losses of two wonderful, strong women I found myself in a bit of a daze, neglecting the part of my personality that used to bring me so much joy and a sense of identity: creativity. A few weeks ago though I felt as though a veil of apathy had been lifted suddenly off my body, and the ideas and excitement came flooding back. I’d really missed this important part of my life and it feels so wonderful to welcome it back.

Although my degree is in illustration I’ve always been most at home with a more fine art style, sticking to this because I know it’s my strength and I know how to get the results I want, but inside my heart I’ve always held a love of children’s book illustration, and I’ve been having so much fun lately playing around with this style. Until now I’ve always wanted my work to be ‘right’ from the time I start until the time I finish, not really allowing myself much time to play around and experiment, but I’m turning over a new leaf! I’m reminding myself that it’s ok to make mistakes sometimes, and that experimenting is part of the joy of creating. On a long train journey recently I listened to an interview with Judith Kerr, the inspirational 95 year old who wrote and illustrated children’s books such as ‘The Tiger Who Came to Tea’ and ‘Mog’. It was so refreshing and reassuring to hear her admit that even after decades of illustrating she still finds certain things difficult and said ‘ I do a lot of rubbish, you have to work through the rubbish’. I’m allowing myself to be more experimental and reminding myself it’s ok to explore an idea, then decide it’s not going in quite the right direction. ( You can listen to the interview with Judith Kerr here: Link)

I’ve been spending a lot of time imagining up characters that belong in the pages of a children’s book and feel like I’ve finally found a style that works for me and that I’m happy with (excuse the dimness, i took these early morning)

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Artists and illustrators, particularly students, often talk of ‘style’, something which I’ve been reading about lately. It’s interesting to hear different people’s views and I’ve been a bit on the fence with my own opinion. I’ve just signed up to a 5 day email course on ‘finding your style’ as I’m curious to see what this could bring up. After years of creating art work almost daily I feel like when it comes to fine art I’ve developed a way of working that works for me, that I ‘know’, and use again and again, but when it comes to illustration I feel like I’m more transient. When it comes to character design I’ve found a way that works for me, but on the other hand there are so many ways of drawing and creating that a part of me feels I shouldn’t confine myself to a certain way of working. I read an interesting blog post that left me feeling reassured, that said some illustrators just don’t stick to a specific way of working, they work more to their brief, something I feel I can accept. However, I’ve also read other opinions saying that style is important as it’s almost like your calling card, it helps identify you as an illustrator. After reading some good reviews I’m currently working my way through ‘Illustration Workshop’ by Mary Kate McDevitt, which has been helpful in giving myself some focus. It claims to help you ‘find your style, practice drawing skills, and build a stellar portfolio’. Although the book is American, it’s still relevant to the UK, and I’m enjoying working on the projects, as well as reading the useful tips that are scattered throughout. You can find it on Amazon for around £10-£13 (LINK)

I’m really enjoying engaging my brain again and have been looking into possibilities for the near future. As someone with ASD and fibromyalgia getting about can be a bit difficult, but after some research I’ve been opened up to a world of possibilities. I want to reassure anyone with physical or social difficulties reading this that there are options out there for you, you just have to find them, and find a way of working/living that works for you and your particular lifestyle. For quite some time now I’ve been interested in using art as therapy and although I looked into doing my masters in Art Psychotherapy and went to an open day I knew it would be very full-on, especially for someone with limited physical and social energy. Although disheartened I decided to look in to alternatives and found an online course. Although this won’t qualify you as an art therapist you’ll receive a diploma and learn what art therapy entails. I’m hoping to use this when I begin volunteering with the Alzheimer’s Society as a ‘side by side’ volunteer (one to one visits to individuals with Alzheimer’s) to engage who I’m paired with. The Open University is also a good option for those who have disabilities or work/family commitments. I’m currently studying ‘Improving Health & Wellbeing’, which I felt could also help with my volunteering. It may surprise some people to know that even some mainstream universities offer ‘distance learning’.  For example, the University of London offers an MA in Art History. I’m keen in the near future to apply to study for my Masters in Illustration (distance learning) at the University of Hertfordshire. I was also excited to see that the London Art College offer an ‘Illustrating Children’s Books’ year-long online course. So whilst living with a disability can often feel frustrating and feel like your possibilities are limited, there are ways around it.

Last week I visited for a second time the awe-inspiring Peterborough Cathedral. My best friend lives not too far away and first took me to this treasure a few months ago. The architecture is unbelievable and sitting in the grounds sketching on a sunny day under a tree is a lovely way to spend an hour. Last time I visited we popped in to the visitor centre and discovered a little exhibition. It was so nice to meet the artists behind the work. It was all fantastic but two women’s work really spoke to me. I loved the way Stacey-Ann Cole (LINK) used watercolour, it translated really well into postcards, and was definitely something I’d love to frame and put on my wall. I also met mosaic artist Mahemuda Arsalani whose work was so beautiful. I loved her mosaic hearts so much I got one for my Mum’s birthday (she also loved it!). You can visit her website here: LINK

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Mosaic by Mahemuda Arsalani (Muni’s Mosaics)

As for my sewing (as you know I love nothing more than upcycling material into something new!) for a while now I’ve been interested in getting involved with a charity called ‘Days For Girls’, who in their own words:  ‘increases access to menstrual care and education by developing global partnerships, cultivating social enterprises, mobilizing volunteers, and innovating sustainable solutions that shatter stigmas and limitations for women and girls’.  There are sewing groups and individuals (known as ‘super sewists’) all over the world, creating the ‘DFG Kit’, which is then sent to young women across the globe. What a great way to use up my leftover material…as well as a good excuse to pick up some more! If you’re a keen sewer with a little time to spare, or have been interested in joining a sewing group, visit their volunteering page to find out more: Link

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Leftover & new material

So I’m happy to say that I’m back and will be starting my monthly reviews again, kicking off with Body Kun/Chan artist model dolls (gone are the days of the clunky wooden mannequin!) and in coming months I’ll be reviewing materials, books, and hopefully exhibitions.

Have a creative July!

 

 

 

Forget me not

I’m going to admit something surprising….until the other day I hadn’t touched a paintbrush for the entire month of February. As an illustrator whose whole world revolves around art, I’ve found myself in an odd space these past couple of months. I’ve kept my creative self active, as you know, by sewing and crafts, but since the beginning of the year my artistic side seems to have gone in to hibernation. The other day, fearing I’d somehow magically lost the ability to create art, I had a strong urge to return to my desk and pick up where I left off with my autobiographical piece, and as I got lost in that bubble I enter when I’m painting or drawing, the floodgates opened. I found my heart pouring in to my work, fuelled by music (which I hadn’t listened to this year until that point), and felt just like I used to when I was engrossed in a piece; the piece becomes sort of like a puzzle, like a ‘paint by numbers’ in my head, where my brain works out what colours to mix and where to put them, until bit by bit the picture forms. As I was painting, thinking about a truly adored family member who we lost at the beginning of the year, I realised what I was actually painting: Forget me not’s.

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As some of my followers may know veganism is another huge art of my life (links to recipes at the end!) and last month I was excited to attend the Viva Vegan fair in Cardiff. It seemed even more popular than last year! And it was great to see creativity, as well as compassion, was a big part of the fair. There were stalls with all sorts of creative offerings, with artists, crafters, and even a photographer selling their work. Here are my top 3, take a look at their websites, especially if you’re looking for something ethical as well as unique!

1

‘Wear your voice’ website: link

I’ve mentioned this website before as I love the unique designs that are like wearing a piece of art! What’s more the fabric ink used is environmentally friendly and not tested on animals.

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‘The Healing Pear’ Website: Link

When I came across the intricately carved gemstones I was stunned that they’d been hand carved! This talented maker gets her inspiration from: ‘the amazing places I’ve been fortunate enough to call home around the world’

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3

‘BeWilder Nature Photography’ Website: link

I was awe struck when I saw Geraint’s stunning work. From unbelievable macro shots of insects, to birds and landscape scenes, Geraint’s online gallery brings to life the beauty of nature.

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I’ve always been interested in using art and creativity as a springboard to benefit other causes, from using it therapeutically, or in this case to contribute to animal welfare, which is why I jumped at the chance to get involved with Viva’s (link) planned art auction next year. For those who’ve never heard of Viva, they’re an animal charity promoting an ethical lifestyle and have gone from strength to strength over the past 24 years. The website is bursting with useful and interesting content, from health guides and campaign materials, to an ethical shop and recipes. Their ever expanding list of projects also includes ‘Art for Animals’, a way for artists and makers to use their talents to benefit animals. Take a look at the artists here, or if you’re a creative type then why not get involved? I’m already planning the piece I’m going to contribute!

Vegan Recipes (click to open new window)

Chickpea bites

Alternative Easter oatcakes

Healthier sushi

 

An art lovers’ guide to Caerphilly

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In previous posts I’ve mentioned my involvement over the past two years in the Y Galeri Caerffili Open Art Exhibition and this month my ‘monthly review’ brings you an introduction to the small but blossoming art scene in this little Welsh town.

Type ‘art in Caerphilly’ in a search engine and the first thing you’re likely to see mentioned is Y Galeri. This small gallery, which moved to its current location in 2015, has become a hub of creativity, displaying work from talented local artists and makers, and bringing together creatives, as well as offering the wonderful opportunity of guidance and gallery space for each year’s Open Art competition winner. The gallery, though small, is a must-see for any art enthusiast visiting the area, and is just a stone’s throw away from the impressive Caerphilly castle, which has been the subject of many entries in to the yearly competition. One such piece which was shown at this year’s exhibition was a lino cut by Elanor Whiteman, who lives and works in Caerphilly, and has taken part in an extensive list of solo and group exhibitions around England and Wales. You can view Elanor’s work on her website here: http://eleanorwhiteman.wixsite.com/print/about

The Gallery is a great place for visiting art fans to begin, especially as just upstairs you’ll find the visitor’s centre (link) where you’ll find information leaflets, a café, and local crafts and gifts. The friendly staff are also on hand to answer any questions, and it’s open daily from 10-5:30 (The gallery is open Tues-Sat 10-5:00).

If you’re planning a trip to the town and want to cram in as much creativity as possible, Caerphilly holds a number of craft fairs throughout the year, with handmade items from talented local crafters, conveniently near the visitor centre. You can find out more by visiting the Caerphilly Craft Fair facebook page here:  link

In addition to craft fairs and the gallery, Caerphilly also has an art society, which holds a week-long exhibition each Autumn displaying members work, from enthusiastic beginners, to professionals. The society also holds demonstrations and workshops and guests are always welcome (prices apply). To find out more email caerphillyart@gmail.com

Useful Links

Trip adviser reviews for Y Galeri Caerffili: link

Y Glaeri Caerffili facebook: link

Twitter: link

Website: link

Caerphilly art society facebook: link

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Cariad the cat

Some see it as a way for companies to make money, others go giddy at the romance, I see it as a chance to get creative! I’m talking of course, about the swiftly approaching Valentine’s Day. For the past few days I’ve been busy honing my skills (and stabbing my poor fingers!) in a craft I’m pretty new to: needle felting. My followers may remember a post from the end of last year in which I shared my very first foray in to the world of needle felting [link] Since then I’ve taken the craft in my own direction, straying from instructions, and adding my own little extras. With Valentine’s Day in mind, I created this kitten from a set given to me as a gift. When I got going, my creative mind took over and I began to improvise…may I introduce you to Cariad (Welsh meaning ‘love’)

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Want to have a go but follow a vegan lifestyle? I’ve got it sorted! Read my guide to everything wool here: Guide to ethical knitting or take a look at the Heidi Feather’s website and etsy for vegan-friendly supplies.

If you’re interested in ethical felting, or looking for a truly unique felted gift, it’s worth taking a look at the work of Matilde Bartoletti [etsy link] who strives for ‘CRUELTY-FREE FELTING and art (created without the use of materials coming from animals exploitation; or that do not contribute to animals abuse).’ and whose creations are made using ‘either synthetic, vegetal, or recycled wool’. Take a look at some of her work below (click image for direct link)

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As well as keeping myself busy sewing and felting I also attended the Y Galeri Caerffili awards presentation event. It was great to see so many like-minded creatives enjoying and discussing each other’s art work. The winning piece was actually the one that stood out to me most at my visit the week before, an ominous and atmospheric etching titled ‘Blodeuwedd and the Pedigree Moon’ by Ian Fisher. You can see the winning piece by scrolling down on Y Galeri Caerffili’s facebook page [link]

In the spirit of the impending Saint Valentine’s Day, I leave you now with some Buddhist quotes on love to ponder over…

‘Relationships are based on four principles: respect, understanding, acceptance, and appreciation’ – Gandhi

‘Where there is love there is life’ – Gandhi

‘Happiness never decreases by being shared’ – Buddha

Monthly tutorial: easy peasy toddler skirt

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This month I’m bringing you a super easy introduction to making children’s clothes. This tutorial is good for beginners or sewers looking to boost their confidence. The skirt will fit most 3 year old’s, but can stretch and will sit just above the knee.

You will need:

. 2 pieces of material (I used light cotton) measuring 45cm (width) 25.5cm (height)

. Fabric scissors

. Cotton to match your material

. Sewing needle

. pins

. 47cm elastic

Step 1

 

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Iron your material and cut out your 2 pieces

Step 2

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To make the edge of your skirt neat you’ll need to create a hem. You can use bias binding, but to keep it simple we’ll be making a simple hem. Turn over a few cm’s of material and pin into place.

Step 3

 

 

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Use back stitch to sew your hem. Back stitch is an easy, strong stitch. If you’re not sure how to do back stitch you can find tons of tutorials on youtube [link]

If you want to add sequins or decoration to your skirt, now is the time to do it before you sew your pieces together.

Step 4

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Once you’ve done your hem on both pieces of material, put your material right-side together, and pin around an inch from the edge of your material, on both the left and the right. This is going to be your seam. Use back stitch again to sew up your sides.

Step 5

 

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Press your seams open. This is the easiest option for beginners, but if you want extra neat seams you can find my tutorial here: How to neaten a seam

Step 6

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Turn your skirt the right way around. It should be starting to resemble a skirt.

Step 7

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Now we have to make the waist band. Take your elastic, and fold the top of the material over it, leaving some excess, and pin in to place (see below). Do this on both sides, and remove the elastic.

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Note: make sure your seam is flat, not folded over:

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Step 8

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Use back stitch to sew all around your waist band, leaving a couple of inches to feed the elastic through.

Step 9

Attach a safety pin to the end of your elastic and feed it through the waist band.

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Step 10

Once your elastic is all the way through, overlap the ends by about an inch, and sew together.

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Step 11

Sew the gap up, and adjust until ruffles are even all around, and voila! you’ve just made a skirt!

Once you’ve gained some confidence the sky is he limit! But if you’re looking for something read-made take a look at my newly uploaded collection of eco-friendly upcycled clothing [Link] including the piece I mentioned in a recent post, inspired by St Dwynwen’s/Valentine’s day. Simply click the images below for more pictures and details.

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Quick Review: Grayson Perry

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Title: The Most Popular Art Exhibition Ever

Author: Grayson Perry

Price: £9.49 – £17.00 (RRP £16.99)

Thanks to a vibrant red cover and distinctive typography this book won’t go unnoticed on a shelf! The title itself draws interest, and was in fact the title given by Perry to one of his exhibitions, which ran from the 8th June to the 10th of September at the Serpentine Gallery last year. The synopsis on the inner cover expresses Perry’s commendable belief that ‘ art shouldn’t be an exclusive club for people who ‘get’ it, but for everyone’. However, it must be said that in his introduction (which is more a small essay) his references to publications, artists, and exhibitions, would probably bewilder anyone other than those already holding a keen interest in art, rather than your ‘average Joe’, something which Matt Breen of Time Out firmly believes Perry isn’t: ‘What really undermines all his elitism-versus-populism, high-versus-low, posh-versus-common prevaricating is a strong sense that, deep down, he wishes he was still the un-pigeonhole-able outsider’ [Full article] and also:  ‘Perry is now a fully-paid member of the establishment. Power, popularity: whatever you want to call it, he has it’. That may be so, but one thing is undeniable: Perry’s work is full of narrative and symbolism. It’s not only his work that conveys the thought behind his work, but also his very honest, analytical introduction. There is definitely passion fuelling his work.

In addition to an introduction from Perry there’s a contribution from Sandy Toksvig, who appeared on The Graham Norton show with Perry back in 2016. Her contribution further emphasises the political tone of the exhibition/book, delivered in an interesting, story-like narrative.

From the very beginning of the book you feel as though you’re immersed in the sketchbook of Perry, with doodles and illustrations littering the cover. What’s nice is that as well as high quality images of his finished work further in the book, you’re first granted a peek in to Perry’s creative and thought process, with annotations revealing snippets of thoughts. A note of warning to parents though, this book does contain some graphic sketches, so isn’t suitable for children. That being said, Grayson fearlessly and effectively confronts a subject close to his heart: masculinity, just one of the many issues covered in his work.

The book is very image-heavy, which could be argued to be apt as the art takes centre stage to speak for itself.  However, each piece does come with an unassuming commentary, many of which divulge the interesting stories detailing the events/thoughts that lead to their creation.

The pieces themselves are wonderfully diverse, with a variety of mediums, from tapestry and ironwork to more traditional mediums. It’s interesting to see Perry’s sketches coming to life and serving their purpose: to create thought.

Final verdict Obviously a book will never compare to actually attending an exhibition, but I found this interesting, thought-provoking, and would recommend it to anyone with an interest in Perry, or even just symbolism and politics in art.

You can find this book on Amazon: link

Ebay: link

Book Depository: link

 

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