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Hanna-Mae Illustration

Illustrator & eco clothing designer

Month

July 2016

Some Wednesday words of wisdom

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When working on a fine-detail drawing, to get an extra sharp pencil point use both a sharpener and then gently run a very sharp craft knife over the tip. I use Kum Extra Long Point Pencil Sharpener and Jakar Hobby Knife.

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If you use turpentine to thin your oil paints or oil pastels, a cheaper yet just as effective alternative is to head to the DIY section/shop and look out for ‘white spirit’. Price comparison: Winsor & Newton ‘Artists White Spirit’ (turpentine) from The Range – £7.99 per litre. Wickes ‘White Spirit Low Odour’ – £1.90 per litre. Note: Please follow environmental/safety advice provided with turpentine/white spirit.

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Save jam jars, marmalade jars, coffee jars etc. Especially if you are using oils/water-mixable oils, you will need to replace water jars several times a year as grime builds up.

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I was delighted to discover B pencils that exceeded the usual 6B maximum you often get in sketching sets, yet, in my personal experience 7B-9B pencils offer not much more depth. To get deeper shadows, try cross-hatching using a fine-liner. I use Pilot DR drawing pens in 01 and 02. BE WARNED: Use a light touch to avoid crushing the nib!

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And whilst on the topic of fine-liners…don’t be tempted by pens that aren’t designed to be used in art work as they may bleed. Some things are ok to scrimp on, whilst others in the long run will cost you more. Plastic palettes and rulers – yes; paper, brushes, and mediums in general – no.

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Taking Great Photos – Quick book review

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Title: The Crafter’s Guide to Taking Great Photos: Foolproof techniques to make your handmade creations shine online

Author: Heidi Adnum

Publisher: Search Press Ltd (21st Dec 2011)

Price: £12.99

Are you a crafter looking to show off your work online? Or perhaps an artist wanting to show your work in it’s best light? Whether you’re a complete novice in the world of photography, or are an old hand just looking for tips and ideas on brushing up your skills, then this is the book for you!

Organised into logical chunks and divided by craft (for example ‘fashion & fabrics’ and ‘knitting & needle craft’) the book is easy to navigate your way around, whilst also having the benefit of visual examples to accompany written instructions, for those of us who learn better by demonstration rather than text alone.

However, to fully understand the layout I strongly recommend scanning the contents pages before you begin (something often overlooked in eagerness to ‘get stuck in’) as subjects such as ‘light’ are found not only in the ‘camera basics’ section, but also further on in the ‘DIY accessories tutorials’ section, which without understanding the layout could cause confusion.

What’s wonderful about the book is that, unlike some photography books, it’s not automatically assumed that the reader has extensive, or even further than a basic understanding of photography, and guides you step-by-step, from the very beginning (getting to grips with a camera) to the very end (editing, uploading, and generally making use of your photos).

The book also includes interviews with practitioners who work within each subject area, for example knitting, and presents relevant questions. This allows beginners to learn from other’s experiences, saving time spent ‘hitting and missing’ – this has already been done for you! and the resulting conclusions/tips there for the taking.

The book also takes into consideration cost, meaning it’s in-tune with the reality of the often limited budget of artists and crafters. What you spend on purchasing this book, you could potentially save on photography equipment. The section ‘DIY accessories tutorials’ offers relatively simple and low-effort (not to mention inexpensive) ways of creating everything from a tripod, to a light tent and light box.

My second recommendation is to arm yourself with a pen and notepad and take notes as you read, as there are so many useful hints and tips throughout. After reading the book I came away with several pages of useful advice. Below are my top 5 favourite:

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  1. Read your camera manual! (yes, it may sound obvious, but we’re often so eager to get started with our gadgets that we fail to consult the manual. Learn the modes/settings on your camera)
  2. Plan your shoot beforehand
  3. To show the scale of your fabric, use items involved in the making, for example, dressmaker’s scissors
  4. You can add ‘value’ to your photo by using your own packaging and props
  5. Make use of what’s around you – try shooting in a forest or somewhere industrial

 

This book is available on Amazon .

 

Wearable art – 10 to try

If (like me) art is your passion, you’ll know that the ‘creative feeling’ doesn’t just stop when you put down that paintbrush or pencil. I’ve been searching the net for unique ways to take a little work of art with you wherever you go, and better still these lovelies aren’t mass-produced by machines, but preserve that personal touch by being made by individual artists/crafters.

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I absolutely love the art work of etsy shop owner Sarah Cox. This brooch shows her quirky style (definitely check out her pet portraits with a difference!) You can find this beautiful brooch in her shop, SarahCoxArtwork.

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Another brooch, again with a unique style. This is hand-painted by Natasha, owner of etsy shop NatashaArtdolls. Better still, there’s 15 designs to choose from! Good luck in deciding…

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It was difficult to decide what to feature from LRsWorkshop – the converse shoes they’ve transformed into works of art, or one of their eco bags. Eventually I opted for this bag as I was drawn to the striking design.

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HELUNArt on etsy is full of colourful treasures, including this hand-painted top. I love how intricate and boho the design is.

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Roseberry Art & Craft, opened this year, is one of my happy little discoveries. On my wish list is Viola’s super sweet robin bookmark and hand-painted original daffodil card. What’s great about Roseberry Art & Craft is that each piece is an original, meaning you’re truly getting something one of a kind.

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If you’re looking for something a little bit different, then Ruth, of ShePaintsSeaglass is the answer! I love her miniature art works, which are painted on found items from the beach, including (you guessed it) sea glass, but also pebbles.

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As soon as I saw the adorable makeup bags in MosMea I fell in love. Any cat lover will break a smile at the sight of this little gem! And there’s good news for dog lovers too…

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I’ve always loved looking through nature books for their illustrations, especially those depicting birds. The talented Meryl, owner of etsy shop FelicitiesCrafts offers beautiful, predominantly nature-based makeup bags, including this hand-painted gem.

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Another item that appeals to my nature-loving side and available in various colours. I love these hand-painted bee brooches from Jessie Growden’s Folksy shop.

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Another Folksy find…QueenofPersia offers some unique and interesting jute bags; creative and useful – perfect to store your art materials in and take on your travels with you.

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